Panels details > Panel 62

P62 - Understanding energy controversies in energy governance

PANEL Organizers
• Tamara Metze (t.metze@uvt.nl), Tilburg University (The Netherlands)

• Jennifer Dodge (jdodge@albany.edu), University at Albany (United States)
• Basil Bornemann (basil.bornemann@unibas.ch), University of Basel (Switzerland)

SUMMARY
In many countries the governance of energy systems is becoming increasingly controversial, especially in relation to the exploitation, transport and use of new energy sources - including unconventional oil and gas development as well as renewable alternatives such as wind energy, geothermal energy, solar power and bio fuels. The nuclear power disaster in Fukushima; smaller incidents such as drinking water contamination and earth trembles, as well as increased knowledge about the environmental impacts of energy production have triggered resistance to industrial energy activities. In addition, changes in geo-political, economic and technological landscapes and political ideas, such as “sustainable development” or a “zero carbon society”, have influenced energy governance. These dynamics have triggered old and new conflicts, which challenge and transform incumbent regimes of energy governance. Energy controversies in energy governance touch upon issues of energy security in light of deepened geo-political conflicts, environmental and safety concerns, local land use conflicts as well as moral and distributional issues. All over the world, governments, political parties, energy companies, environmental organizations, scholars, and citizens are engaged in heated debates over desirable and realistic energy futures. Many embrace a transition towards a sustainable energy system, but not all envision the same goals and pathways, and some fight against it. How can these energy controversies be interpreted? What are their roles for energy transitions? How do they shape energy governance? This panel invites papers that adopt an interpretive perspective to analyzing the interplay between energy controversies and energy governance. By focusing on meaning and interpretation, we aim to go beyond overt approaches that highlight the role of interests and institutions and illuminate the fundamental meaning of societal, scientific and political conflicts that enliven and underlie efforts to govern energy futures. We especially invite papers that investigate cases from non-Western countries.

KEY WORDS
Interpretive approach, energy controversies, energy governance.

ROOM
Faculty, E2.13


SESSION 1 : 10/07/2015 : 09:00-10:30
Chairs:
Tamara Metze (t.metze@uvt.nl), Tilburg University (The Netherlands)

Jennifer Dodge (jdodge@albany.edu), University at Albany (United States)
Basil Bornemann (basil.bornemann@unibas.ch), University of Basel (Switzerland)
Discussant:
Imrat Verhoeven (i.verhoeven@uva.nl), University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands)

The Three Mile Island disaster and the emergence of alternative discourses on nuclear energy in Belgium (1979)
Karel Deneckere (karel.deneckere@vub.ac.be), Free University Brussels (Belgium)
Benjamin De Cleen(benjamin.de.cleen@vub.ac.be), Free University Brussels (Belgium)

• Energy controversies in Ghana: implications for sustainable energy transitions
Sandra Pointel (s.pointel@sussex.ac.uk), University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

The astounding rise of the Energy Transformation narrative: an analysis of German political energy discourse
Anna Leipprand (leipprand@mcc-berlin.net), Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (Germany)
Christian Flachsland (flachsland@mcc-berlin.net), Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (Germany)
Michael Pahle (michael.pahle@pik-potsdam.de), Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (Germany)

• Interpreting the role of conflicts in the strategic governance of energy transitions
Basil Bornemann (basil.bornemann@unibas.ch), University of Basel (Switzerland)
Thomas Saretzki (thomas.saretzki@uni.leuphana.de), Leuphana University Lueneburg (Germany)

SESSION 2 : 10/07/2015 : 11:00-12:30
Chairs:
Tamara Metze (t.metze@uvt.nl), Tilburg University (The Netherlands)

Jennifer Dodge (jdodge@albany.edu), University at Albany (United States)
Basil Bornemann (basil.bornemann@unibas.ch), University of Basel (Switzerland)
Discussant:
David Laws (D.W.Laws@uva.nl), University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands)

• Dynamic discourse coalitions on hydro-fracking in Europe (the Netherlands) and the United States (New York)
Jennifer Dodge (jdodge@albany.edu), University at Albany (United States)
Tamara Metze (t.metze@uvt.nl), Tilburg University (The Netherlands)

Competing discourse coalitions in the Dutch energy transition
Rick Bosman (bosman@drift.eur.nl), Erasmus University Rotterdam (The Netherlands)
Pj Beers (beers@drift.eur.nl), Erasmus University Rotterdam (The Netherlands)
Derk Loorbach (loorbach@drift.eur.nl), Erasmus University Rotterdam (The Netherlands)

Constructing Climate Change in the U.S. Rust Belt: A Study of Climate Frames and Climate Policy Development in Michigan and Indiana
Sonja Thielges (sonja.thielges@fu-berlin.de), Free University Berlin (Germany)

• Comparing nuclear power trajectories in response to environmental controversy in Germany and the UK: from “regimes” to “democracies” in sociotechnical transitions and discontinuities
Phil Johnstone (p.johnstone@sussex.ac.uk), University of Sussex (United Kingdom)
Andy Stirling (a.c.stirling@sussex.ac.uk), University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

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